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BLOOD CANCER HAS MET ITS MATCH

Kaiser Permanente is teaming up with Be The Match to help more patients find a life-saving blood stem cell donor. It’s easy to join the donor registry. All it takes is a simple cheek swab.

Randy-Yamanaka-Luke Do
Randy Yamanaka (left) donated blood stem cells to Luke Do

Lam Do is a Kaiser Permanente doctor and his son, Luke, was diagnosed with leukemia as a baby. Lam knows how lucky Luke was to find a life-saving donor and today Lam continues to pay it forward.

Read and watch his full story >

Joining the Be The Match Registry means volunteering to be listed as a potential blood stem cell donor, ready to save the life of any patient in need.
You could be someone’s cure. You could save someone’s life.

General Registration Questions

Am I eligible to join the registry?

You can join the Be The Match Registry if you:

  • Are between the ages of 18-60
  • Live in the United States
  • Meet health guidelines
  • Are willing to donate to any patient in need

If you are between the ages of 18-44, patients especially need you because research shows that cells from younger donors lead to more successful transplants. To make the best use of our resources, individuals ages 45-60 are required to cover their own cost of joining ($100).
Everyone on the registry is critical to saving lives. For all registry members, the most important thing you can do is stay committed, so if you’re selected as a match for a patient you’re ready to move forward.
U.S. military personnel are asked to register for Be The Match Registry® through the Department of Defense (DoD).

You can join the Be The Match Registry if you:

  • Are between the ages of 18-60
  • Live in the United States
  • Meet health guidelines
  • Are willing to donate to any patient in need

If you are between the ages of 18-44, patients especially need you because research shows that cells from younger donors lead to more successful transplants. To make the best use of our resources, individuals ages 45-60 are required to cover their own cost of joining ($100).
Everyone on the registry is critical to saving lives. For all registry members, the most important thing you can do is stay committed, so if you’re selected as a match for a patient you’re ready to move forward.
U.S. military personnel are asked to register for Be The Match Registry® through the Department of Defense (DoD).

What’s donation like?

It depends on how you donate.

Most give through a Peripheral Blood Stem Cell (PBSC) donation. A machine draws blood from one arm, extracts the cells it needs, and returns the remaining blood through your other arm.
Others give through a marrow donation. Liquid marrow is withdrawn from the back of your pelvic bone with a needle. In this case, you’ll receive anesthesia and feel no pain during the procedure.
The patient’s doctor decides which method is best for their patient.

It depends on how you donate.

Most give through a Peripheral Blood Stem Cell (PBSC) donation. A machine draws blood from one arm, extracts the cells it needs, and returns the remaining blood through your other arm.
Others give through a marrow donation. Liquid marrow is withdrawn from the back of your pelvic bone with a needle. In this case, you’ll receive anesthesia and feel no pain during the procedure.
The patient’s doctor decides which method is best for their patient.

Does it hurt?

Probably less than you think.

While TV shows and movies have wildly exaggerated bone marrow donation as something scary, the reality is much less dramatic. Donors are given anesthesia so they feel no pain during collection. Discomfort during recovery varies from person to person. Side effects may include back pain, fatigue, headache or bruising for a few days or weeks.
PBSC donors may experience headaches or body aches several days before collection, but these disappear shortly after donation.
Most donors feel completely recovered within a few weeks. It’s a small price to pay for the chance to save a life.

Probably less than you think.

While TV shows and movies have wildly exaggerated bone marrow donation as something scary, the reality is much less dramatic. Donors are given anesthesia so they feel no pain during collection. Discomfort during recovery varies from person to person. Side effects may include back pain, fatigue, headache or bruising for a few days or weeks.
PBSC donors may experience headaches or body aches several days before collection, but these disappear shortly after donation.
Most donors feel completely recovered within a few weeks. It’s a small price to pay for the chance to save a life.

Are there any health risks?

Relatively few.

Your body replaces the marrow that you give. And while no medical procedure is completely risk-free, every precaution is taken to ensure the safety and well-being of the donor.

Relatively few.

Your body replaces the marrow that you give. And while no medical procedure is completely risk-free, every precaution is taken to ensure the safety and well-being of the donor.

Is sharing my personal information and DNA risky?

We protect your privacy and confidentiality.

Maintaining your trust is essential to saving lives. That’s why your personal identifying information will not be shared with any companies or government agencies. 

We have rules in place to protect the rights and privacy of both donors and patients. 
Information about your genetic type and the stored sample from your cheek swab are identified by a code and stored separate from your personal identifying information.

We protect your privacy and confidentiality.

Maintaining your trust is essential to saving lives. That’s why your personal identifying information will not be shared with any companies or government agencies. 

We have rules in place to protect the rights and privacy of both donors and patients. 
Information about your genetic type and the stored sample from your cheek swab are identified by a code and stored separate from your personal identifying information.